2nd April 1865 – Richard Cobden (death)

Richard Cobden (1804-1865) Camden High Street, NW1 Sculptors W & T. Wills Sicilian Marble, 1868

Richard Cobden (1804-1865)
Camden High Street, NW1 Sculptors W & T. Wills Sicilian Marble, 1868

Richard Cobden was a wealthy calico trader who formed the Anti-Corn-Law League. Once the Corn Laws were repealed, Cobden became a Liberal MP and a fierce opponent of Palmerston’s aggressive foreign policy. Napoleon III was the largest contributor to this monument, which is now very badly eroded.

 

This is an extract from the latest edition of London’s Monuments, which features all of London’s major public monuments. Available from our website at £2.00 off the RRP (recommended retail price)

http://tinyurl.com/ow8uorj

This is an extract from the latest edition of London's Monuments, which features all of London's major public monuments. Available from our website at £2.00 of the RRP (recommended retail price)  http://tinyurl.com/ow8uorj

 

1st April 1794 – Elias George Basevi (birth)

Private Garden, Belgrave Square, SW1 Sculptor Jonathan Wylder, Bronze, 2002

Private Garden, Belgrave Square, SW1 Sculptor Jonathan Wylder, Bronze, 2002

Elias George trained as an architect with Sir John Soane and was one of his favourites. Like his mentor, Basevi’s work was of a classical style, inspired by his travels to Greece and Italy. Many of his major works are outside London, most notably the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. He did design several grand squares in West London including Belgrave Square. Basevi met a premature and violent end, falling from the ceiling of Ely Cathedral while inspecting its restoration.

This is an extract from the latest edition of London’s Monuments, which features all of London’s major public monuments. Available from our website at £2.00 off the RRP (recommended retail price)

http://tinyurl.com/ow8uorj

This is an extract from the latest edition of London's Monuments, which features all of London's major public monuments. Available from our website at £2.00 of the RRP (recommended retail price)  http://tinyurl.com/ow8uorj

1st April 1875 – Edgar Wallace (birth)

Ludgate Circus at the junction with Fleet Street, EC4 Sculptor F. Doyle-Jones, Bronze medallion, 1934

Ludgate Circus at the junction with Fleet Street, EC4 Sculptor F. Doyle-Jones, Bronze medallion, 1934

Edgar Wallace tried many jobs before enlisting in the army to escape his mounting debts and unhappy engagement. He was sent to South Africa during the Second Boer War but left to become a war correspondent for the Daily Mail in 1898 and later the editor of the Rand Daily Mail. He returned to England and was given a job at the Daily Mail by Alfred Harmsworth. While reporting the Russo- Japanese War Wallace began his first thriller The Four Just Men. The book was a great success but owing to a reckless competition which Wallace devised he lost money on the venture. He went on to write all kinds of popular page-turners but divorce and his reckless lifestyle left him always in debt. He moved to Hollywood to become a screenwriter, but died soon after his arrival. Wallace’s writing is now largely forgotten, but during the 1960s his racy plots and sharp dialogue were adapted for television and he is still a household name in Germany, where many of these programmes were made.

This is an extract from the latest edition of London’s Monuments, which features all of London’s major public monuments. Available from our website at £2.00 off the RRP (recommended retail price)

http://tinyurl.com/ow8uorj

This is an extract from the latest edition of London's Monuments, which features all of London's major public monuments. Available from our website at £2.00 of the RRP (recommended retail price)  http://tinyurl.com/ow8uorj